Curriculum Infusion as Transformative:  Changing the Production of Knowledge

Page last updated on 08/19/2014

Best Sources

The research literature of your own field is your best resource for gauging the impact of inclusivity on the production of knowledge in your discipline. 

AAC&U maintains Diversity Web, "an interactive resource hub for higher education." See in particular the section on Research and Trends.

Intersections

The theoretical construct that has proven most transformative of knowledge has been the idea that all of us are multiply identified, and that the systems that structure social hierarchies interact with one another. 

From the Women's Health Research Network of Canada, an annotated bibliography of significant theoretical essays on the concept of intersectionality (the interrelationships among the various forms of oppression).  Transnational focus.

Race, Gender, and Class Bibliography, Jean Ait Amber Belkhir, American Sociological Association.  "This is the first, unique bibliography which contains items ONLY if they emphasize the three dimensions of race, gender, and class in their discourse and analysis."  Organized by interdisciplinary disciplines, traditional disciplines, and critical pedagogy.

Additional Sources

"AAC&U has provided national leadership on the issue of diversity in higher education since 1971. AAC&U’s current work in this area focuses primarily on deploying diversity as an educational asset for all students, and preparing future graduates for socially responsible engagement in a diverse democracy and interdependent world. Both are key elements of quality liberal education. AAC&U has created a community of institutions committed to making diversity an integral part of educational excellence and civic engagement." It's true. Check it out.

For additional information on AAC&U's current and past projects, please see Global Learning, Civic Engagement, and Women.

Tolerance.org's "Writing for Change"  Describes numerous writing assignments and in-class exercises that help students evaluate the role of language and writing in maintaining inequality.  Includes exercises to help students evaluate professional writing in their major.