Spring 2014                    Skip to:        Feb.        Mar.        Apr.

Sisters of Freedom Poster

February 10-14, 2014  
SISTERS of FREEDOM

A 6-poster exhibit, highlighting the work of 40 Remarkable African-American Women

Cartwright Center Galley

The panel exhibit will be displayed near the Cartwright Info. Desk and Red Mango.


Sponsored by the UW-L Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Dept., Campus Climate & Diversity, Office of Multicultural Student Services, History Dept., Asian, Latina, African, Native American Women (ALANA), Black Students Unity, and Women's Studies Student Association


For more info., please contact: Mahruq Khan, mkhan@uwlax.edu

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, February 19, 2014, 4 PM, Hall of Nations (1300 Centennial)   

Miss Saigon, Orientalism, and the Problematics of International Adoption: Challenging Racial, Gendered, and Familial Commonsense


Dr. Sara Docan-Morgan, Communication Studies

and

Dr. Gerald Iguchi, History


 

Miss Saigon posterIn this talk, Dr. Sara Docan-Morgan will discuss difficulties faced by Koreans adopted by white American parents and how narratives of cultural forms such as Miss Saigon and its predecessor Madame Butterfly exacerbate and perpetuate their pain and alienation. Dr. Gerald Iguchi will discuss a long history of the Orientalist, imperialist, and racial commonsense present in and perpetuated by the aestheticized racism of these same cultural forms. The idea for this presentation arose out of protests against the October 2013 theatrical run of Miss Saigon at the Ordway Center for the Performing Arts in St. Paul, MN. Both Docan-Morgan and Iguchi are themselves products of inter-ethnic, inter-”racial” adoption.


Sponsored by the UW-L Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department


For more information, please contact: Mahruq Khan at mkhan@uwlax.edu




Thurs, March 6, 2014, 5pm Appetizers, 5:30pm Program, Hall of Nations (1300 Centennial Hall)

International Women’s Day Panel & Reception


The event will consist of a panel of culturally-diverse women, reflecting on the impact of gender on their educational and personal experiences in their countries of origin


Sponsored by the AAUW-La Crosse Branch, Gundersen Global Partners, Office of International Education, League of Women Voters, UW-L Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies Dept., and YWCA-La Crosse.


For more information, please contact: Mahruq Khan at mkhan@uwlax.edu

 

 

 

 


Monday, March 10, 2014, 4pm, 1309 Centennial Hall

Nirobey (“Silently”)

Film Screening


Due to the socialization of women in many parts of the developing world, NGOs recruit women as employees for their (perceived) submissiveness. Many of these women, devoted to noble professional causes, personally endure further exploitation within these NGOs and never achieve their own potential. This Bangladeshi documentary, directed by Jannatul Ferdous Ivy, examines one woman’s quest to challenge her superiors’ authority, debunk stereotypes about people with disabilities, and demand greater protections and dignity for all human rights activists.


Sponsored by the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Dept.


For more information, please contact: Mahruq Khan at mkhan@uwlax.edu






Wed, March 12, 2014,4-5:30pm, Hall of Nations1(300 Centennial Hall)

Exploring UW-L Undergraduates' Attitudes Towards Rape and Sexual Assault


Dr. Terry Lilley (Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies)

Dr. Laurie Cooper Stoll (Sociology/Archaeology)


Rates of rape and sexual assault are 4x higher for female students aged 18-24 than for non-students in this age group. Drs. Cooper Stoll and Lilley believe these higher rates of victimization reflect enduring gender inequalities that exist in higher education and society, in general.  Based on findings from an online survey administered to undergraduate students at UW-L during Spring 2013, this talk explores the ways that gender-blind sexism continues to perpetuate an environment conducive to rape and sexual assault.


Sponsored by the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Dept.


For more information, please contact: Mahruq Khan at mkhan@uwlax.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tues, April 8, 2014, 9am-5pm, Port O’Call, Cartwright Center
Project Retrospect: Flipping the Script on Rape


Project Retrospect: Flipping the Script on Rape is a photography project aimed at changing the way we think about rapists, victims, and sexual assault prevention. When we, as a society, look at sexual assault, it is easy for some to engage in victim-blaming talk, such as: “How much did the victim have to drink?” and “Well, men can't be raped, so he must be gay.”  The real question is: “Why are we not blaming the rapist?” In addition, why not ask: “Why do rapists feel entitled to rape and how are they getting away with it?” 
 

Sponsored by Survivors Empowered Through Art, UW-L Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Dept., and Office of Student Life/Violence Prevention


For more information, please contact: Mahruq Khan at mkhan@uwlax.edu




April 28-30, 2014
What's Your Tree?: Having a Life of Purpose, Passion, and Power

Julia "Butterfly" Hill


 

Mon, April 28 at 7pm in 1400 Centennial:

So, often we hear the question, can one person really make a difference?  The reality is that because no choice happens in a vacuum, it is literally scientifically IMPOSSIBLE to have no impact and to make no difference!  Even our choices to do nothing has a very real impact on our world.  When we recognize that EVERY thought, word, and action changes the world, we stop asking the myth of can one person make the difference, and we start realizing that each and everyone of us DOES make the difference!  In this space, we start asking ourselves instead, what kind of a difference do I want to make with my life?

Tues, April 29 at 4pm in 1400 Centennial:

Julia Hill will reflect on her personal experience as an environmental activist to inspire students into action. She will challenge the audience to consider sustainable practices and engage in green initiatives to remind us that each person can make a difference. Julia will guide the audience through several critical questions, such as: "What is it in your life that can cause you and call you to be bigger than you know yourself to be?" and "What holds you back and what tools can set you free to be the person your spirit and heart are called to be?"  According to Julia, "We all have a symbolic tree or trees that create the space for us to grow beyond the limits of the mind and soar into the realms of the infinite space of living lives of loving and purpose-filled service!"

Bio:

Julia Butterfly Hill is an activist, a writer, educator, and a poet. The recipient of numerous prestigious awards and distinctive honors, Julia is one of the most internationally renowned figures in environmental activism.  She brought global attention to the plight of the world’s last remaining ancient forests when she climbed 180 feet into the branches of a 1000-year-old redwood tree as part of a “tree sit,” a non-violent method of civil disobedience that involves perching high in a tree in order to protect it and the surrounding trees from logging. She refused to come down for 738 days as part of her historic protest to the environmental destruction caused by the clear-cutting of ancient redwoods. It eventually culminated with an agreement with Pacific Lumber Company.

As an anti-war activist, Hill helped shut down San Francisco’s financial district before the invasion of Iraq in 2003. She was arrested and forcibly deported from Ecuador in July 2002, due to her solidarity activism on behalf of the indigenous population displaced by the nation’s oil development.

Hill is the youngest person ever elected to the Ecology Hall of Fame and was named by John F. Kennedy Jr., in George Magazine, as one of the twenty most influential women in politics. She is the author of the national best seller, The Legacy of Luna, co-author of One Makes The Difference, and her latest release, Becoming. She founded the non-profit organization, Circle of Life, co-founded “What’s Your Tree?” and was the visionary of “We The Planet,” setting the standards for green festivals, events, and tours in the U.S.  

Julia Butterfly Hill speaks regularly on university campuses, has addressed the United Nations, lobbied Congress and has continued to stand on the front lines of environmental and social justice issues all over the world.  Her courage, conviction and profound clarity in articulating a message of hope, empowerment, love, and respect for all life have inspired millions of people worldwide.

Julia Butterfly Hill speaks regularly on university campuses, has addressed the United Nations, lobbied Congress and has continued to stand on the front lines of environmental and social justice issues all over the world.  Her courage, conviction and profound clarity in articulating a message of hope, empowerment, love, and respect for all life have inspired millions of people worldwide.


 

Fall 2013        
Skip to:   Sept.        Oct.           Nov.             Better Man Series   

How to be a Better DrinkerMasculinity Series flyer:  Part of the Better Man Series

UW-L Masculinities Group

Wednesday, September 25, 2013
7:00 pm
Hall of Nations

An open forum on masculinity, drinking, and making smart decisions.

Campus Climate, Wellness Resource Center 

Candlelight Vigil & Speak Out
in Honor of Victims & Survivors of Domestic Violence

Tues, Oct. 1st, 5:30pm
UW-L Hoeschler Clock Tower

Speakers * Refreshments * Music

Sponsored by: UW-L Student Life/Violence Prevention Office, New Horizons Shelter & Outreach Centers, Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Dept., Women's Studies Student Association, Gundersen Health System DV/SA program, Mayo Health System Safepath

For more information, please contact: Ryan Nell, nell.ryan@uwlax.edu

Film screening of “The Dark Matter of Love” & Discussion w/ Director

Wed, Oct. 2nd
6-7:30pm Screening (Free)
7:30pm Meet & Greet with the Director ($10 for reception with appetizers and cash bar)
Valhalla, Cartwright Center

“The Dark Matter of Love” tells the story of three of the last Russian children able to be adopted into an American family. They were treated for attachment disorders by a world-renowned psychologist and a local clinician for two years which culminated in a film called "The Dark Matter of Love."

Sponsored by the La Crosse County Human Services Dept, Coulee Parenting Magazine, Family & Children Center, Gundersen Health Systems, MY Innovative Services, and UW-La Crosse.

For more info, please contact Rhonda Rude: rrude@lacrossecounty.org

WGSS Internships Informational meeting

WGSS Internships info meeting flyerOct. 8, 2013
4 pm
WGSS Senior Seminar Room, 4309 Centennial Hall

What can an internship do for you?  Come hear from WGSS students who have done internships themselves, along with Karolyn Bald from Career Services and Jodi Vandenberg-Daves who coordinates internships for WGSS! 

“Girl Rising” Film screening

Fri, Oct. 11
First screening: 1:30pm
2nd screening: 4pm
1309 Centennial

Girl Rising is a global action campaign for girls' education. Centered by the new feature film, Girl Rising, the film uses the power of storytelling and the leverage of strategic partnerships to deliver a simple, critical truth: Educate Girls and you will Change the World.

Sponsored by: UW-L Organization for Campus Women, Campus Climate & Diversity Office, and the Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Dept.

For more information, please contact: Teri Talpe, ttalpe@uwlax.edu

“Shattered Glass” multi-media performance  

Tues, Oct. 22, 2013
7pm
1400 Centennial Hall (auditorium)

Shattered Glass is a multi-media stage presentation, demonstrating the healing power of the arts through spoken word, dramatization, live music, and art. SHATTERED GLASS is "performance with purpose," empowering viewers to transcend from a state of victimization to victory.

Bios:

Shaunelle Curry, Executive Director of Media Done Responsibly (MDR), is an author, poet, master's level educator, and advocate for women and youth.  In 2003, Shaunelle published her first book, SHAIRI'S JOURNEY THROUGH DARKNESS INTO LIGHT, a women's self-development toolkit. Shaunelle has been featured on radio broadcasts in Los Angeles and other parts of Southern CA, Chicago, Atlanta, and Philadelphia.

Kelley Nicole is at the charming intersection of a spunky funky attitude and an alluring R&B acoustic vulnerability.  She was formerly one of the lead vocalists for the critically-acclaimed Afro-funk band, Soulfege.  She currently serves as the Executive Director of Harvardwood, a global nonprofit organization of Harvard alumni & students working to strengthen ties among the arts, media, entertainment, and education.

Free and open to the public.

Sponsored by the: UW-L Violence Prevention Office, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Dept., Women’s Studies Student Association, and the Wellness Center

For more information, please contact: Mahruq Khan, mkhan@uwlax.edu

The Homophile Movement in Mexico City, 1940-1960: The Spanish Republican Refugee Press, American Leftist Exiles, and Mexican Homosexuality

Víctor M. Macías-González, Ph.D.
Professor of History and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Wed, Nov. 6
4 pm
Hall of Nations, 1300 Centennial Hall

This talk examines the role that affluent, professional same-sex-attracted males in Mexico City played, through their travel abroad or international connections, in the development of homophile culture from the 1930s to 1960s. Termed homophile this mid-twentieth-century precursor to the LGBT movement disarmed critics by emphasizing love and friendship (-phile) between same-sex individuals, rather than sex.  Adherents changed sexual consciousness through their identity politics, publications, and combated public hostility to same-sex friendships, relationships, and desire. With origins in the pre-war European leftist and post-war American civil rights organizations, homophiles combated state surveillance of homosexuals, cultivated a sense of public propriety and criticized flamboyant behavior, public displays of affection, promiscuity, and gender non-conformance. Advocating an assimilationist model of homosexual relationships that idealized long-term monogamous relationships between individuals of similar class and educational background, homophiles embraced a proper, bourgeois gay identity.

Sponsored by the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Dept.

For more information, please contact: Mahruq Khan, mkhan@uwlax.edu

Gender Through Their Lenses: A Film of Students' Images

with
Carol D. Miller (Sociology & Archaeology, UW-L) and
Mark J. Seitz (Information Communication Technology M.A. student, UW-Stout)

Tues, Nov. 19
4pm
Hall of Nations, 1300 Centennial Hall

Students in a Sociology of Gender class were each required to provide five digital photos of something they have seen in their world that reinforces gender stereotypical beliefs or behaviors.  The photos were organized into themes related to assigned readings on gender and work, family, sexuality, health, education and more.  A short film using their photos was created for them to review and discuss.  

Sponsored by the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Dept.

For more information, please contact: Mahruq Khan, mkhan@uwlax.edu

“The Invisible War” Film Screening with Discussion to follow

Wed, Nov. 20
4pm
1400 Centennial Hall (auditorium)

The Invisible War is a groundbreaking investigative documentary about one of America’s most shameful and best kept secrets: the epidemic of rape within the U.S. military. Focusing on the powerfully emotional stories of rape victims and survivors, the film is a moving indictment of the systemic cover-up of military sex crimes, chronicling the women’s struggles to rebuild their lives and fight for justice.

Sponsored by the UW-L Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Dept., Violence Prevention Office, Wellness Center, and Survivors Empowered through Art

For more information, please contact: Mahruq Khan, mkhan@uwlax.edu

Spring 2014 

Coming Soon!